Painted Union Jack, September 2012. ©Ali Winstanley/PYMCA

Daddy G, Massive Attack posing. Meltdown Festival, London, 2008. ©Lawrence Watson/PYMCA

Snapshot surveillance by photographer and writer, Hartnett.

’75, NOT ‘76

Caroline. Coon. Caroline Coon.

Caroline Coon, creator of my teenage wallpaper. The pages of two copies of her book 1988 (Orbach & Chambers, 1977) were neatly ripped from the glued spine and pasted to my walls, at the age of eighteen in Ealing, London W5. 

Cover star, Johnny Rotten x 2. Back of wardrobe door, inside of wardrobe door. Back-cover star, Soo Catwoman. Upon my bedside table and  above my bed, framed.

1988 cost £1.95 at the time of publication, seemed a lot back then. Filed under General Non-fiction, it seemed wrongly classified, as to me, the movement documented within the cheap, lightweight paper was as unexpected as Marshans arriving to whisk us elsewhere.

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A group of young bikers at the Norfolk seaside, 1980. ©Philip Grey/PYMCA

Polaroid portraits of clubbers 1990s. ©Paul Hartnett/PYMCA

Teenage boy sitting on a silver moped outside a newly built housing complex. ©Phil Knott/PYMCA

PAUL VICKERY

NORTHERN SOUL

PY-ZINE is proud to announce a refreshingly topical and exclusive series in perfect timing for Elaine Constantine’s well awaited film released today (October 16th, 2014), Northern Soul. The shoot incorporates part of the film’s true cast including Josh Whitehouse and radiates an authentic energy.

All Images ©Paul Vickery/PYMCA

WHO, WHERE, WHEN:
A guy with a eyebrow piercing squinting at the sun on Brighton pier and a girl sucking a lollipop, Brighton, UK, 2000’s. ©Marc Vallee/PYMCA

WHO, WHERE, WHEN:

A guy with a eyebrow piercing squinting at the sun on Brighton pier and a girl sucking a lollipop, Brighton, UK, 2000’s. ©Marc Vallee/PYMCA

Snapshot surveillance by photographer and writer, Hartnett.

ERO-KAWAII

Ero, an abbreviation of erotic.

Kawaii, Japanese for cute.

The tradition of Tokyo’s colourful characters who frequent the fashion eco-system of Tokyo’s Harajuku district spans from the early 80s, when the styling was bubblegum 50s rock ‘n’ roll. The basic approach is Burokko, a term that means fake children. Uh-huh.

Hugely influenced by the syrupy style of Manga and Hello Kitty, Sundays are now hilarious mayhem in Harajuku, as teens play with all concepts cartoony, fluffy, frilly and panto Goth. It might look weird, but turn that mirror upon the West.

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WHO, WHERE, WHEN:Two teenage boys climbing over a garden wall in a housing estate. Lambeth Walk, South London. c. 2000. ©Simon Wheatley/PYMCA

WHO, WHERE, WHEN:

Two teenage boys climbing over a garden wall in a housing estate. Lambeth Walk, South London. c. 2000. ©Simon Wheatley/PYMCA

WHO, WHERE, WHEN:
Man in a crocodile jacket leaning against a car, Brazil, 2000’s. ©Robin Maddock/PYMCA

WHO, WHERE, WHEN:

Man in a crocodile jacket leaning against a car, Brazil, 2000’s. ©Robin Maddock/PYMCA

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PYMCA Photographer & Writer Jacqueline Soares intellectually hits the road with her research and inspiration on the incredibly influential Beat Generation.

THE LEGACY OF THE BEAT GENERATION 

‘Each generation rediscovers Kerouac on their own terms’

(Douglas Brinkley)

Any young person growing up today will find it extremely difficult to identify the origin of this contemporary generation’s behaviour.

The Beat generation was a generation with many questions, and many answers to those questions are regarding the freedom of today’s youth.

Youth has always questioned, innovatively and creatively. They are always connected to the modern, revealing alternative paths, in an attempt to challenge our culture and society, not just youth culture. 

Nothing is completely new. Even in the fifties, there was a mix between the old and the new. Nowadays, people try to label the new based on the past.

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Both Images ©Robin Maddock/PYMCA

There is still a conservatism today, so youth culture needs to continue this questioning attitude.

The freedom of the Beats is in the sexuality today. Gay men and women couldn’t ‘come out’ in the fifties and sex before marriage was seen as a sin. There is much more acceptance today in previously “alternative” sexual identities, especially among young people, and this can be traced at least in part to the Beats.

The freedom to question yourself and your place in the world in today’s youth can be traced to the Beats too. They were always questioning Why? How? What? And When? These are eternal questions asked by the Beats and everyone who in-between.

They taught this youth how to be open –souled and embrace the exuberance of life.

There was no prejudice against others based on skin color or orientation. Even the music they liked was a mix of cultures, but the Beat Generation wasn’t just about sex, drugs and jazz.

Kerouac’s travel changed the mind of everyone who lived after, youth’s view about the world, the culture of the West and the view of everyone on the road.

Even those who didn’t read the book were influenced by him and his work, because he founded the culture of the road and is considered a pivotal reference to the future subcultures.

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©Dosfotos/PYMCA

Snapshot surveillance by photographer and writer, Hartnett.

LFW PS

Hey, it’s been a few weeks since London Fashion Week, but I’ve been looking through images that were culled from the first mini-report on the PYMCA zine. So, here’s an unexpected LFW PS for all you Fashion Design and Fashion-related students out there, new to PYMCA. 

What I loved about LFW this season was the ethnic mix of young people, especially from Scandinavia and Africa. A group of students from Finland were real head turners, in a natural and understated way.

That said, for me, it was African youth from West Africa in particular who got cameras clicking. Young designers from Ghana and Nigeria were on MAX, and very much inspired by the buzz around KTZ.

Bearing in mind the Ebola outbreak since March of this year, my heart goes out to these people. Such an epidemic is a challenge, a challenge to us all at a time when world peace is ALL of our business.

hartnett.uk.com

All Images and Text ©Hartnett/PYMCA 

THE WHO: Teenage Boy wearing electronic tagTHE WHERE: LondonTHE WHEN: 2003

©Giles Moberly/PYMCA

THE WHO: Teenage Boy wearing electronic tag
THE WHERE: London
THE WHEN: 2003

©Giles Moberly/PYMCA

THE WHO: A girl in ragga stylesTHE WHERE: Notting HillTHE WHEN: 2006

©Marni Henderson/PYMCA

THE WHO: A girl in ragga styles
THE WHERE: Notting Hill
THE WHEN: 2006

©Marni Henderson/PYMCA